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C.F. Møller Architects is behind Denmark’s first certified sustainable convenience store

C.F. Møller Architects

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C.F. Møller is one of Scandinavia’s leading architectural firms; with 90 years of award winning work in the Nordics and worldwide.

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C.F. Møller Architects has in collaboration with Netto and Salling Group developed the concept for the first free-standing convenience store to achieve a DGNB Gold certification. The store is made of timber and cladded with wood and terracotta tiles.

C.F. Møller Architects has in collaboration with Netto and Salling Group developed the concept for the first free-standing convenience store to achieve a DGNB Gold certification. The store is made of timber and cladded with wood and terracotta tiles.

The first Danish sustainable free-standing grocery store to obtain a DGNB Gold certification is located in Horsens, Jutland. The store is the very first completed Green Netto out of many to come with a strong focus on sustainability, and the concept has been developed in a collaboration between C. F. Møller Architects, Netto and Salling Group (the owner of the Netto brand).

– We are happy about this collaboration between including a common ambition to create a sustainable building which we humbly hope can set the standard for future sustainable grocery stores. In this work we have used our experience in timber and brick architecture, and from timber research projects that we are involved in, in combination with digital design tools that we have developed to optimise i.e. the daylight and customer experience and minimise the CO2 footprint, says Klaus Toustrup, Architect and Partner at C.F. Møller Architects.

Photo: C.F. Møller Architects / Julian Weyer

Netto Bygholm Bakker

The Green Netto’s facades are composed of terracotta tiles and wooden elements, and the roof structure is designed in Danish-produced laminated timber. The entrance area is lined with heat-treated Nordic pine. A large glass entrance section draws daylight deep into the building and makes the shop appear bright and open, creating a view to the beautiful timber roof construction.

– We want our customers to enjoy shopping in our stores. Together with C.F. Møller Architects, we have invested many resources in both ensuring that experience and at the same time setting a new standard for how we build and run our stores in a much more sustainable way, says Michael Løve, Executive President Netto International.

Sustainable and circular construction
The landscape solution around the store enhances the local area’s biodiversity with native shrubs and trees as well as natural grasses and wild flowers. A green sedum roof contributes to rainwater retention and temperature control by retaining heat during the winter months and providing natural cooling during the summer months.

Solar cells on the roof and a heat pump system that utilises excess heat from the freezers and refrigerators to heat up the building make the store partly self-sufficient with energy.

An exceptionally good indoor climate for a grocery store is assured by the large intake of daylight and improved air quality.

The building elements and mechanical joints are designed to enable disassembly of building parts for recycling and use in other construction projects.

Photo: C.F. Møller Architects / C.F. Møller
All sustainable initiatives are documented for DGNB Gold certification.

Green Netto at Bygholm Bakker in Horsens:
– The store is DGNB Gold certified

– Most of the building is made of sustainable timber to minimise environmental impact

– The building’s elements and mechanical joints make it easy to disassemble and re-use

– The sedum roof contributes to maintain a stable indoor climate

– Solar cells and a heat pump system make the store partially self-sufficient

– Large windows ensure daylight in the store

– Improved air quality for a healthy indoor climate

– Opportunity to charge electric cars

About DGNB
DGNB (Deutsche Gesellshaft für Nachhaltiges Bauen) is an international sustainability certification adapted to Danish conditions.

To obtain DGNB certification, a building or urban area is evaluated on the basis of a number of criteria within the five main areas of DGNB; environmental quality, economic quality, socio-cultural and functional quality, technical quality and process quality.
DGNB is managed in Denmark by the Green Building Council Denmark, which is a non-profit organisation working to promote sustainability in the construction industry.

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