How to save and recycle water without compromising product quality

The availability of water will be a critical issue in the future, and the cost of water will rise. This white paper gives food and beverage companies a valuable insight into the possibilities of water efficiency.

Water scarcity

The availability of water will be a critical issue in the future, and the cost of water will rise. With higher living standards and a global population predicted to reach 9 billion people in the next few decades, the demand for water will increase significantly. Nearly three-quarters of total water consumption in the world relates to the consumption of food and drink, and the United Nations has estimated that before 2030, water consumption will rise by 30 percent. Therefore, the water footprint of food products will get more attention from consumers, and be highly visible on political agendas in the near future.

Sustainable use of water can be turned to the advantage of those who take steps to respond to the shortage of fresh water in the world. Frontrunners that develop high levels of water efficiency before others, and who work to specific and measurable targets with respect to reducing their water footprint, can turn water and resource efficiency into a competitive advantage.

Denmark knows water efficiency

Water rates in Denmark are some of the highest in the world, reflecting the actual costs of water extraction, wastewater treatment and environmental protection. For decades, Danish food and beverage industries have shown their skills in developing new products and increasing production, despite facing rising water rates and stricter disposal regulations. Today Danish consultants and technology companies work with food and beverage companies in Denmark and around the world, to increase their water efficiency without compromising product quality. This white paper gives food and beverage companies a valuable insight into the possibilities of water efficiency.

 

Partners featured in this publication