A new maritime era

Stricter international environmental regulations combined with shipping companies’ focus on energy and cost efficient operations are driving a green conversion in the maritime sector. This White Paper demonstrates opportunities and lessons learned from different stakeholders across the Danish maritime industry, supported by state-of-the-art case examples.

Complete Green Solutions that work in Practice

The Danish merchant fleet has overall cut its CO2 emissions by almost 50 per cent proportionate to the dead weight tonnage since 2008. In addition to this significant increase in energy efficiency, Danish ships have achieved a considerable lowering in their emissions of sulphur and other air pollutants.

Danish maritime equipment manufacturers and ship designers are on the preferred maker’s lists of ship-owners around the globe. They are chosen for their quality, flexibility, innovation and high-end services offering solutions for ballast water treatment, air emission reductions and energy efficiency.

Danish maritime technologies and solutions are often developed in close cooperation and partnerships between Danish shipping companies, equipment manufacturers, shipyards, knowledge institutions and public authorities. This collaborative approach fosters innovation and the development of competitive, easy-to-integrate solutions that work in practice.

About this White Paper

The aim of this White Paper is to share some of Denmark’s solutions and experiences in green maritime solutions.

We have gathered a selection of examples and opinions, each demonstrating opportunities and lessons learned from different stakeholders across the Danish maritime industry, supported by state-of-the-art case examples. The content provides insight into the developments of green maritime solutions in Denmark, and the frameworks needed to further enable these developments.

This White Paper is intended as a tool for inspiration using concrete and ready-to-be-implemented Danish technologies and solutions. As such, the cases found in this publication act as means for the global maritime industry to meet demand for transporting 20 billion tonnes of cargo annually – a doubling from current volumes – by 2030 in a sustainable way. And importantly, to meet this demand by illustrating maritime solutions that are sustainable, not just in terms of the environment, but in terms of economics as well.