News

World’s Longest Power Cable to Connect Denmark With the UK

State of Green
By State of Green, October 31, 2017

The Danish Minister for Energy, Utilities and Climate has given the green light to a 750-kilometre-long cable (Viking Link) that will connect Denmark with the United Kingdom. The cable, which will be the world’s longest direct current cable, will help provide Denmark with a highly secure supply and better potential for selling its wind-produced power.

The cable will run from Vejen in southern Jutland to Bicker Fen in Lincolnshire, around 170 kilometres north of London. At 1400 megawatts, its transmission capacity will be the equivalent to one third of Denmark’s total consumption.

-Strong electricity connections abroad are crucial for a small nation like Denmark. We will be able to sell our power in a larger market when we have a surplus of renewable energy. At the same time, we get a larger supply of power to Denmark when the wind does not blow and the sun does not shine. Strong electricity connections to our neighbors thus contribute to ensuring cheap and reliable power for consumers and to keep the value of the wind power high. It is for the benefit of all Danes and companies in Denmark, says Minister for Energy, Utilities and Climate, Lars Christian Lilleholt.

-Related news: Electricity Interconnectors between the UK-Denmark and Denmark-Germany of Great Socio-Economic Benefits

Largest-ever Danish investment
In addition to the new cable, a high-voltage grid will be installed between the West Jutland town of Holstebro and the Denmark-Germany border, with the work divided between two projects. The three projects – including the cable – will cost a total of DKK 11 billion (EUR 1.5 billion), making it the largest-ever Danish investment in electricity infrastructure.

-Realated news: Royal Inauguration of New Danish-Norwegian Power Connection

Important for the green transition 
The investment is a cornerstone of Danish energy policy and the government’s forthcoming energy agreement. With increasing volumes of renewable energy in electricity generation, both in Denmark and in the countries around us, Denmark’s international electricity connections mean that the power can be produced where the nature and climate allows for wind, water and solar power, and at the same time easily can be transported to where it is needed.

-We do no longer see energy and climate policy as a strictly national topic. We no longer live on isolated “energy islands”. Our energy systems and energy markets are already linked, and it is important that they are expanded so that we get the best possible benefits from wind turbines and solar cells in the future, says Lars Chr. Lilleholt.

-Related news: Denmark to Share Power with the Netherlands

Construction is scheduled to begin in 2019, with the project expected to be completed by 2022.

The cost of building the cable will be shared between Denmark and the United Kingdom.

Source: Danish press realease from Ministry for Energy, Utilities and Climate. 

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